MILITARY LEGACY OF NELSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY AND BEYOND

GENEALOGY ~ PHOTOGRAPHS ~ LETTERS ~ HISTORY


Written And Compiled By Waukesha Lowe Sammons

Daughter of Daskum Combs (1917 - 2005) And Technical Sergeant, Albert Roy "Jake" Lowe (1917 - 1944),

who was awarded a Silver Star Medal for Action Taken on The Fourth of July 1944 in France,

and who was Killed In Action on September 16, 1944 in World War II.

Copyright 2017 ~ info@perrycountykentuckymilitarylegacy.com ~ All Rights Reserved

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NELSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY SOLDIERS, SAILORS, AIRMEN, MARINES

REMEMBER AND NAME

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AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR (1775 - 1783)

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BRASHEAR

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BRASHEAR, IGNATIUS “NACY” (1734 – after 1832), AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR.
HOMETOWN:  Moved to Kentucky in 1784.
OTHER RESIDENCE:  Maryland, during the American Revolutionary War. 
DATE OF BIRTH:  17 April 1734 in Prince Georges County, Maryland.
PARENTS:  Elizabeth Brashear and Samuel Brashear, Jr.  They were double-first-cousins.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Mary Jones and Benjamin Brashear, who was the son of Alice and Robert Brashear, who was the son of Mary Richford and Benjamin Brashear, a French Huguenot immigrant.
SPOUSE:   Frances Pamela.
SON:  Levi Brashear, who married Camilla Lansdale in Bardstown, Kentucky.
GRANDSON:  Richard G. Brashear, The Battle of Coleto, Slaughtered in the Goliad Massacre by Santa Anna’s Mexican Troops, Texas Revolutionary War of Independence.
GRANDSON:  William P. Brashear, Texas Revolutionary War of Independence.
GREAT-GRANDNEPHEW:  William C. Brashear, Naval Commander, Texas Navy, Texas Revolutionary War of Independence.
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:  Maryland.
ENLISTMENT DATE:  18 January 1777.
~ On a Maryland Military Muster Roll for February 1778.  Private Ignatius Brashear, [enlisted] for 3 years.
~ Muster Roll for April 1778:  Ignatius Brashear, guard.  
DISCHARGE DATE:  18 January 1780.
RANK:  Private.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  Foot Soldier.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:
~ Captain John Davidson’s Company of the Second Maryland Regiment of Foot, Commanded by Colonel Thomas Price.
~ “Friday, 5 May 1780... That the Commissary of Stores delivered to Ignatius Brashear lately of the second Regiment one Coat and Waistcoat ..., page 163.  Source:  Maryland Archives, Journal and Correspondence of the State Council of Maryland.
~ “Private Ignatius Brashear, Sr. served in the Prince George County, Maryland Line Company, which was commanded by Captain Reazin Beall, then by Captain Bracko, who was slain and then by Captain Jno. Davidson.  The Second Regiment of Foot was commanded by Colonel Thomas Price.  Ignatius served from 18 January 1777 to 18 January 1780.”  Source:  The Brashear – Brashears Family, 1449 – 1929 by Henry Sinclair Brashear, 1929.  
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:
RESIDENCE:  “1784, Moved to Kentucky and settled on the Salt River near what is now Shepardsville ...”.  Source:  The Brashear Story A Family History by Troy L. Back and Leon Brashear, 1962. 
April 14, 1832, APPLICATION FOR A PENSION:  “Ignatius Brashears ... age 79, a sister, Dorcas Brashears ... being in need of a pension.  He enlisted as a private in the Maryland Line Company commanded by Capt. Reazin Beall ...”  Source:  The Brashear – Brashears Family, 1449 – 1929 by Henry Sinclair Brashear, 1929.    
DATE OF DEATH:  After 1832 in Shephardsville, Kentucky.
CEMETERY:
SOURCES:  Maryland Archives, Journal and Correspondence of the State Council of Maryland.
North America, Family Histories, 1500-200, Daughters of the American Revolution, Lineage Book, p. 299.  The Brashear – Brashears Family, 1449 – 1929 by Henry Sinclair Brashear, 1929.  The Brashear Story A Family History by Troy L. Back and Leon Brashear, 1962.  U. S. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, Maryland.
NOTE:  I placed my first-cousin-seven-times-removed, Ignatius “Nacy” Brashear, Sr. on my ~ Combs Collins Sumner Adams Holbrook Caudill Kelley Mullins; Brashear Young Campbell Cornett Woods Dorton Asher Bowling Sizemore ~ Maternal Family Tree, that I created on Ancestry.


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RUTHERFORD
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RUTHERFORD, JULIUS (ca 1755 – 1831), VALLEY FORGE, VIRGINIA CONTINENTAL LINE, AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR.
HOMETOWN:  Virginia.  Kentucky.  Tennessee.
OTHER RESIDENCE:  Montgomery County, Virginia.  Wythe County, Virginia.  Wayne County, Kentucky.  Knox County, Tennessee.  Anderson County, Tennessee.
DATE OF BIRTH:  circa 1755.
PARENTS:  Ursula Parrish and William O. Rutherford.
BROTHER:  Archibald Rutherford, Private, 7th Virginia Regiment of Foot, served under Captain Joseph Crockett, commanded by Colonel Alexander McClenachan, American Revolutionary War.
BROTHER:  Phineas “Finney” Rutherford.
GRANDPARENTS:  Violetta Reynolds and John Rutherford.
GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Margaret Vawter and Robert Rutherford.  
SPOUSE:  Rhoda Rutherford, who was the daughter of Elizabeth M. Adkins and Joseph W. Rutherford, Jr., who was the son of Mary E. Elliott and Joseph Rutherford, Sr., who was the son of Margaret Vawter and Robert Rutherford.
SON:  Joseph Rutherford, died at The Alamo in Texas, fighting against the Mexican troops of General Santa Anna.  Joseph’s daughter was Carmelita Rutherford.
GRANDDAUGHTER:  Carmelita Rutherford, who married first, Samuel Bean and married second, William Martin.  Carmelita and Samuel’s son was Joseph D. Bean.
GREAT-GRANDSON:  Joseph D. Bean, served in the 28th Regiment, 1st Texas Lancers (Cavalry), commanding officer, Colonel Horace Randall, Confederate States Army, American Civil War.  [Did Joseph Bean die in The Battle of Mansfield or did he survive the war?]  
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:  Virginia.                                                                                                                                 ENLISTMENT DATE:  1776 in Fincastle, now Wythe County, Virginia for 3 years.  January 1777, per a company muster roll.
DISCHARGE DATE:  circa 1780.
RANK:  Private.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  Regiment of Foot.  Waggoner.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:  Private, Captain Rowland Matteson / Madison’s Company of the 8th and 12th Virginia Regiment, Commanded by Colonel James Wood, American Revolutionary War.
VIRGINIA CONTINENTAL LINE, COMPANY MUSTER ROLLS:
~ September 1777, Julius Returford [Rutherford] of Captain Rowland Madison’s Company of the 12th Virginia Regiment, commanded by Colonel James Wood.  Remarks:  Sick at Trenton.
~ December 19, 1777 – June 19, 1778.  General George Washington’s Winter Encampment was located at Valley Forge.
~ April 1778, Valley Forge:  Private Julius Rutherford of Late Captain Rowland Madison’s Company of the 12th Virginia Regiment, commanded by Colonel James Wood.  Remarks:  On Command.
~ June 1778:  Private Julius Rutherford, Waggoner of Captain William Croghan’s Company of the 4th, 8th and 12th Virginia Regiment, commanded by Colonel James Wood.
~ July and August, 1778, Camp White Plains:  Private Julius Rutherford, Waggoner of Captain William Croghan’s Company of the 4th, 8th and 12th Virginia Regiment, commanded by Colonel James Wood.
~ September 1778, Camp Robinson’s Plains:  Private Julias Rutherford of Colone James Wood’s Company of Colonel Wood’s Regiment of Foot from Virginia, Revolutionary War.  Remarks:  Joined from Captain Croghan’s Company.
~ October 1778, Camp Middle Brook:  Private Rutherford of Captain Robert Gamble’s Company of the 8th Virginia Regiment, Commanded by Colonel James Wood.  Remarks:  “This company was designated at various times as Captain Robert Gamble’s and Captain Presley Norvill’s Company.”
~ September 1779, Smith’s Clove.  “Julius Rutherford Enlisted 8 January 1777.”
~ October 1779, Ramapough / Ramapo.
~ November 1799, Havenstraw.
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:  Julius Rutherford participated in The Battle Of Brandywine.  The 12th Regiment, Virginia Continental Line participated in The Battle of Brandywine, The Battle of Germantown, The Battle of Monmouth and The Siege of Charleston.  On May 12th, 1780, soldiers of the 12th Regiment were captured by the British. 
REVOLUTIONARY WAR BOUNTY LAND GRANTS, 1784:  “Julius Rutherford, Virginia Continental Line, Private, 3 January 1784, 100 acres.”
ANNALS OF SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, 1797:  “Julius Rutherford, Wythe County, October 10, 1797, Julius Rutherford ... appointed overseer of the road from the northwest corner of Danners Field to the big branch below said Ewing.”
APPLICATION FOR A MILITARY PENSION:  4 July 1818 in Anderson County, Tennessee.
THE PENSION LIST OF 1820:  “East Tennessee, Julius Rutherford, Private, Virginia Line.”
U. S. PENSION ROLL OF 1835:  “Julius Rutherford, Private, Virginia Continental Line.  Placed on pension roll on January 15, 1819.  Commencement of Pension on July 4, 1818.  Age 75.  [Which year was he age 75?]  “Remarks:  Dropped under act May 1, 1820.  Restored, commenced August 27, 1818.  Died August 3, 1831.”                                                          
DATE OF DEATH:  3 August 1831 in Anderson County, Tennessee.
CEMETERY:
SOURCES:
~ American Revolutionary War Continental Regiments; revolutionarywar.us.
~ Annals of Southwest Virginia, 1769-1800.
~ Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants, Awarded by State Governments, by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, c 1996.
~ Catalogue of Revolutionary Soldiers and Sailors of the Commonwealth of Virginia Land Bounty Warrants to Whom Land Bounty Warrants Were Granted by Virginia for Military Service in the War For Independence, compiled by Samuel M. Wilson, from Official Records in the Kentucky Land Office at Frankfort, Kentucky.
~ Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements & Rosters, Pension Application of Julius Rutherford (Retherford) R9113, Rhoda f53 VA, Transcribed by Will Graves, 8/20/12.
~ The Pension List of 1820 [U. S. War Department], copyright 1820.
~ U. S. Compiled Revolutionary War Military Service Records, 1775-1783.
~ U. S. Pension Roll of 1835, Vol. III.
NOTE:  I placed my husband’s second-cousin-six-times-removed, Julius Rutherford on my ~ Sammons Bradshaw Ferguson Wooton Castle Hopkins Daniel Spencer; McCoy Stafford Stanley May Rutherford Brashear Williamson Ball ~ In-law Family Tree, that I created on Ancestry.

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TEXAS WAR OF INDEPENDENCE AKA TEXAS REVOLUTION (1835 – 1836)

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TEXAS WAS A TERRITORY OF SPAIN, FRANCE AND MEXICO.
MARCH 6, 1836, THE ALAMO FELL TO MEXICAN GENERAL SANTA ANNA.
MARCH 27, 1836, THE GOLIAD MASSACRE AKA LA BAHIA MASSACRE OCCURRED.
APRIL 21, 1836, THE BATTLE OF SAN JACINTO LASTED EIGHTEEN MINUTES:
TEXAS GENERAL SAMUEL HOUSTON DEFEATED MEXICAN GENERAL SANTA ANNA,
THUS ENDING THE TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR.
1837, THE TEXAS TERRITORY BECAME THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS.
1845, TEXAS BECAME PART OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
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BRASHEAR
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SONS OF CAMILLA LANSDALE AND LEVI BRASHEAR:
RICHARD G. BRASHEAR AND WILLIAM P. BRASHEAR 
 

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BRASHEAR, RICHARD G. (      – 1836), “THE MUSTANGS,” THE FIRST REGIMENT, KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS OF BARDSTOWN, KENTUCKY, FOUGHT FOR TEXAS INDEPENDENCE AGAINST MEXICAN PRESIDENT – GENERAL SANTA ANNA IN THE BATTLE OF COLETO; BRASHEAR’S COLONEL, JAMES W. FANNIN, SIGNED A DOCUMENT OF CAPITULATION, ORDERED HIS MEN TO STACK ARMS AND BECOME PRISONERS OF WAR; A WEEK LATER SANTA ANNA DEMANDED THE EXECUTION OF ALL PRISONERS; DURING THE CHAOS OF THE SLAUGHTER, BRASHEAR ESCAPED ACROSS THE RIVER, BUT WAS HUNTED DOWN AND KILLED IN THE GOLIAD MASSACRE, TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE.
HOMETOWN:  Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.
OTHER RESIDENCE:  Texas.
DATE OF BIRTH:
PARENTS:  Camilla Lansdale and Levi Brashear, who was born 1773 in Maryland.  They were married in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.
GRANDPARENTS:  Frances Pamela and Ignatius “Nacy” Brashear, Sr., who was an American  Revolutionary War Soldier.  Private Ignatius Brashear, Sr. served in the Prince George County, Maryland Line Company, which was commanded by Captain Reazin Beall, then by Captain Bracko, who was slain and then by Captain Jno. Davidson.  The Second Regiment of Foot was commanded by Colonel Thomas Price.  Ignatius served from 18 January 1777 to 18 January 1780.  Source:  The Brashear – Brashears Family, 1449 – 1929 by Henry Sinclair Brashear, 1929.
GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Elizabeth Brashear and Samuel Brashear, Jr.  They were double-first-cousins.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Mary Jones and Benjamin Brashear, who was the son of Alice and Robert Brashear, who was the son of Mary Richford and Benjamin Brashear, a French Huguenot immigrant.
GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Ann Jones and Samuel Brashear, Sr.
GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Alice and Robert Brashear.
FOURTH-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Mary Richford and Benjamin Brashear, a French Huguenot, who immigrated to the Colony of Virginia and moved to Maryland.  Benjamin was commissioned Justice of Peace of Calvert County, Maryland in 1661.
SECOND-COUSIN-ONCE-REMOVED:  William C. Brashear (ca 1812 – 1849), Naval Commander, Texas Navy, Texas Revolutionary War. 
SPOUSE:   
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:  Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.
ENLISTMENT DATE:  1835.
DISCHARGE DATE:  27 March 1836, Prisoner of War, Slaughtered in the Goliad Massacre.
RANK:  Corporal.  First Sergeant.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  Kentucky Volunteers.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:  Captain Burr H. Duval’s Company, First Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, U. S. Army, nicknamed “Mustangs.”  The unit was organized in November, 1835 in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.  Colonel James Walker Fannin was in charge at the Battle of Coleto.
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:  Battle of Coleto.
NOVEMBER 1835:  “The Bardstown, Kentucky Volunteers marched to Louisville, sailed down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, and in a couple of weeks or so were at the mouth of the Brazos.”
THE BATTLE OF COLETO, 19 March – 20 March, 1836.  On the second day of battle, Texas Commander, James W. Fannin, Jr. signed a document of capitulation.  The men surrendered their weapons and became Prisoners of War.  Survivor accounts indicated, that the Texans were led to believe they would be returned to the United States.  Source:  Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas, Battle of Coleto by Craig H. Roell.
21 – 27 MARCH 1836, PRISONERS OF WAR:                                                                                                                         ~ “During their captivity, John C. Duval and Richard Brashear, the first sergeant of the company, recognized a Mexican Lieutenant as A. Martinez, their former classmate from St. Joseph’s College in Bardstown” [Kentucky].
~ “Martinez, who won honors for English rhetoric at St. Joseph’s in 1832, had been a roommate  and particular friend of Brashear.”
~ “During the week of their captivity, the prisoners had a number of chats and shared reminiscences of old times with Martinez.”
~ “Duval said that the last time they saw their Mexican friend, on the morning of Palm Sunday, he had an affectionate smile on his countenance and walked off laughing.”
Source:  Kentuckians in Texas:  Captain Burr H. Duval’s Company at Goliad by John B. Thomas, Jr.  Richard G. Brashear by Charles Brashear; sonsofdewittcolony.org.
DATE OF DEATH:  27 March 1836, Palm Sunday in the Goliad Massacre, aka Fannin’s Massacre, a slaughter of the American soldiers, who were Prisoners of War.
~ “On the morning of the 27th of March 1836, a Mexican officer came to us and ordered us to get ready for a march.”
~ “John Duval’s brother, Captain Burr Duval, was killed in the first volley.  RICHARD BRASHEAR was one of those, who crossed the river, but was killed on the other side.  Just under four hundred prisoners perished in the massacre.”  Source:  Kentuckians in Texas by John B. Thomas, Jr.
PLACE OF DEATH:  Goliad, Goliad County, Texas.
STATUS:  Slaughtered, valuables taken, left unburied by the soldiers of Mexican General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (1794 – 1876) and left unprotected from animals and vultures.   
BURIAL:  IF HIS REMAINS WERE FOUND by Republic of Texas soldiers, he was buried on 3 June 1836.
~ “General Thomas Jefferson Rusk of the Republic of Texas gathered the remains and buried them with full military honors on June 3, 1836.”  Source:  Findagrave, bio by Cheryl (Smith) Owens.
CEMETERY:
LAND BOUNTY WARRANT, 12 JULY 1838:
~ “Richard G. Brashear, decd [deceased] arrived previous to Declaration of Independence, entitled to 1st class grant of 1/3 league, located in Brazorio County, To William P. Brashear, as Heir, 12 July 1838.
~ “R. C. Brashear; he received 1920 acres for bounty warrant #59 in Karnes County, Texas, for his death at Goliad...”
Source:  Richard G. Brashear by Charles Brashear; sonsofdewittcolony.org.
MONUMENT:  “The Fannin Memorial Monument marks the location, where the [remains of] the Texans from the Goliad Massacre were finally buried.” wikepedia.org.
HISTORICAL MARKER:  Located at the Fannin Memorial Monument, LaBahia, Texas.
SOURCES:
~ Findagrave.
~ John Crittenden Duval:  The Last Survivor of the Goliad Massacre by William Corner; The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Vol 1, No. 17 (July 1897), pp 47 – 67.   
~ Kentuckians in Texas:  Captain Burr H. Duval’s Company at Goliad by John B. Thomas, Jr.; Maryland Archives, Vol. 3, F – 424 – For Colonial Claims.
~ Kentucky and the Independence of Texas by James E. Winston; The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. 16, No. 1 (July 1912).
~ Kentucky Volunteers In The Texas Revolution by James E. Winston; Register of Kentucky Historical Society, Vol. 11, No. 32 (May 1913), pp 17 -28.
~ Richard Brashear by Charles Brashear.
~ Sons Of Dewitt Colony Texas; sonsofdewittcolony.org.
~ Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas, Battle of Coleto by Craig H. Roell; tshaonline.org.
~ The Register Of The Kentucky Historical Society, Vol. 81, No. 3 (Summer 1983).
~ The Brashear – Brashears Family, 1449 – 1919 by Henry Sinclair Brashear, May 1929.
~ The Brashear Story A Family History by Troy L. Back and Leon Brashear, 1962.
NOTE:  I placed my third-cousin-five-times-removed, Richard G. Brashear on my ~ Combs Collins Sumner Adams Holbrook Caudill Kelley Mullins; Brashear Young Campbell Cornett Woods Dorton Asher Bowling Sizemore ~ Maternal Family Tree, that I created on Ancestry.


BRASHEAR, WILLIAM P. (   – 1846), TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE.
HOMETOWN:  Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.
OTHER RESIDENCE:  Texas.
DATE OF BIRTH:
PARENTS:  Camilla Lansdale and Levi Brashear, born 1773 in Maryland.  They were married in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.
GRANDPARENTS:  Frances Pamela and Ignatius Brashear, Sr., who was an American  Revolutionary War Soldier.  Private Ignatius Brashear, Sr. served in the Prince George County, Maryland Line Company, which was commanded by Captain Reazin Beall, then by Captain Bracko, who was slain and then by Captain Jno. Davidson.  The Second Regiment of Foot was commanded by Colonel Thomas Price.  Ignatius served from 18 January 1777 to 18 January 1780.  Source:  The Brashear – Brashears Family, 1449 – 1929 by Henry Sinclair Brashear, 1929.
GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Elizabeth Brashear and Samuel Brashear, Jr.  They were double-first-cousins.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Mary Jones and Benjamin Brashear, who was the son of Alice and Robert Brashear, who was the son of Mary Richford and Benjamin Brashear, a French Huguenot immigrant.
GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Ann Jones and Samuel Brashear, Sr.
GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Alice and Robert Brashear.
FOURTH-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Mary Richford and Benjamin Brashear, a French Huguenot, who immigrated to the Colony of Virginia and moved to Maryland.
BROTHER:  Richard G. Brashear, Prisoner of War, Slaughtered in the Goliad Massacre, a Corporal in Captain Burr H. Duval’s Company, First Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, U. S. Army, nicknamed “Mustangs.”  The Unit was organized in November, 1835 in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.
SECOND-COUSIN-ONCE-REMOVED:  William C. Brashear (ca 1812 – 1849), Naval Commander, Texas Navy, Texas Revolutionary War.    
SPOUSE:
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:
ENLISTMENT DATE:                                                                                                                                            DISCHARGE DATE:
RANK:  Second Lieutenant.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  Kentucky Volunteers.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:  Captain Price’s Company, Kentucky “Mustangs” Volunteers.  Source:  Kentucky Volunteers In The Texas Revolution by James E. Winston.
~ “William C. Brashear ... served as a second lieutenant in Capt. James Pope Price’s Company of Kentucky Volunteers...”  Source:  Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas.
~ Note:  Did William P. and William C. serve in Capt. James Pope Price’s Company, Commanded by Colonel Chas. L. Harrison?  Or, if only one of them was in that militiary unit, which one?
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:
LAND BOUNTY WARRANT:  “William P. Brashear, arrived previous to 1 August 1836, entitle to 2M?, as a Volunteer from Brazoria County, 7 July 1838.  W. P. Brashears was granted 640 acres on bounty warrant #58 on 16 May 1846 in Karnes County, Texas for service in the Texas Army between 10 June 1836 and 10 December 1836.”  Source:  William P. Brashear by Charles Brashear; sonsofdewittcolony.org.
DATE OF DEATH:  1846. 
CEMETERY:
1846, ADMINISTER OF WILLIAM P. BRASHEAR’S ESTATE:  William C. Brashear of the Texas Navy.
SOURCES:  Indian Depredations In Texas by J. W. Wilbarger.  Kentucky Volunteers In The Texas Revolution by James E. Winston.  Sons of Dewitt Colony; sonsofdewittcolony.org.  Texas, Index Card Collections, 1800-1899.
NOTE:  I placed my third-cousin-five-times-removed, William P. Brashear on my ~ Combs Collins Sumner Adams Holbrook Caudill Kelley Mullins; Brashear Young Campbell Cornett Woods Dorton Asher Bowling Sizemore ~ Maternal Family Tree, that I created on Ancestry.

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BRASHEAR, WILLIAM C. (ca 1812 – 1849), THE TEXAS NAVY, TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR.
HOMETOWN:  Kentucky.
OTHER RESIDENCE:  Texas.  Maryland. 
DATE OF BIRTH:  circa 1812.
PARENTS:  Sarah Goodman and Benedict Brashear.
GRANDPARENTS:  Sarah Tilghman and John Brashear.
GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Rachel Brashear and Samuel Brashear III.
GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Elizabeth Brashear and Samuel Brashear, Jr.
GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Ann Jones and Samuel Brashear, Sr.
FOURTH-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Alice and Robert Brashear.
FIFTH-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Mary Richford and Benjamin Brashear, a French Huguenot, who immigrated to the Colony of Virginia and moved to Maryland.
SECOND-COUSINS-ONCE-REMOVED:  Richard G. Brashear (    - 1836) and William P. Brashear , who were brothers.  Both served in the Texas Revolutionary War.  Palm Sunday, 27 March 1836, Richard was slaughtered in the Goliad Massacre by the order of Mexican President and General Santa Anna.
SPOUSE:
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:
ENLISTMENT DATE:                                                                                                                                             DISCHARGE DATE:
RANK:  Lieutenant.  Commander of the Texas Navy.  U. S. Naval Commander.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  U. S. Navy.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:  Texas Revolution.
~ 1836:  “Lieutenant William C. Brashear, Captain James Pope Price’s Company of Kentucky Volunteers...”  Source:  Sons of Dewitt Colony; sonsofdewittcolony.org.
~ 6 August 1836:  “Served on the brig, HOPE.”
~ October 1841:  “Placed in Command of the steam warship, ZAVALA.”
~ March 1842:  “Forced to run his ship aground in Galveston Harbor to keep her from sinking, after the government refused to appropriate funds to patch her leaks.”
~ 1842:  “Appointed to command of the Galveston Navy Yard.
~ 1842:  “Resigned from the Texas Navy.”
~ 19 July 1843:  “[Sam] Houston nominated Brashear as a lieutenant in the Texas Navy.”
Source:  Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas by Thomas W. Cutrer.
~ Commander of the Texas Navy.
~ Note:  Did both William P. and William C. serve in Captain Price’s Company, Kentucky Volunteers, Commanded by Colonel Chas. L. Harrison?  Or, if only one of them, which one?
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:
18 MARCH 1848, UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT CASE, BRASHEAR V. MASON:   Brashear v. Mason, U. S. Supreme Court, Volume 47, 47 U. S. 6 How. 92 92 (1848).  William C. Brashear, Plaintiff  v. John Y. Mason, Secretary of the Navy, Defendant.  Brashear requested to be paid for his service as Commander of the Navy of Texas and to be recognized as an officer in the United States Navy.
DATE OF DEATH:  31 October 1849, Beltsville, Prince George County, Maryland.
CEMETERY:
1859, APPLICATION RECEIVED BY THE TEXAS NAVY COMMITTEE:  William C. Brashear’s mother, Sara applied for his bounty pay.   
SOURCES:  Brashear v. Mason, U. S. Supreme Court, Volume 47, 47 U. S. 6 How. 92 92 (1848); justia.com and courtlistener.com.  Sons of Dewitt Colony; sonsofdewittcolony.org.  Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas, William C. Brashear by Thomas W. Cutrer.  The Brashear Story A Family History by Troy L. Back and Leon Brashear, 1962.  U. S. Newspaper Extractions from the Northeast, 1704 – 1930.
NOTE:  I placed my fourth-cousin-four-times-remove, William C. Brashear on my ~ Combs Collins Sumner Adams Holbrook Caudill Kelley Mullins; Brashear Young Campbell Cornett Woods Dorton Asher Bowling Sizemore ~ Maternal Family Tree, that I created on Ancestry.

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DUVAL
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SONS OF NANCY HYNES AND WILLIAM POPE DUVAL:
BURR HARRISON DUVAL AND JOHN CRITTENDEN DUVAL
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DUVAL, BURR HARRISON (1809 – 1836), PRISONER OF WAR, EXECUTED AT THE GOLIAD MASSACRE, TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR.
HOMETOWN:  Bardstown, Kentucky.
DATE OF BIRTH:  1809 in Bardstown, Kentucky
PARENTS:  Nancy Hynes and William Pope Duval.
SPOUSE:
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:  Bardstown, Kentucky.
ENLISTMENT DATE:                                                                                                                                             DISCHARGE DATE:
RANK:  Captain.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  Kentucky Volunteers.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:  Captain Burr H. Duval’s Company, First Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, U. S. Army, nicknamed “Mustangs.”  The unit was organized in November, 1835 in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.  Colonel James Walker Fannin was in charge at the Battle of Coleto.
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:  The Battle of Coleto.
DATE OF DEATH:  27 March 1836, executed in the Goliad Massacre.
BURIAL:  IF HIS REMAINS WERE FOUND by Republic of Texas soldiers, he was buried on 3 June 1836.
~ “General Thomas Jefferson Rusk of the Republic of Texas gathered the remains and buried them with full military honors on June 3, 1836.”  Source:  Findagrave, bio by Cheryl (Smith) Owens.
CEMETERY:
MONUMENT:  “The Fannin Memorial Monument marks the location, where the [remains of] the Texans from the Goliad Massacre were finally buried.” wikepedia.org.
HISTORICAL MARKER:  Located at the Fannin Memorial Monument, LaBahia, Texas.
SOURCES:  ~ Findagrave.  ~ John Crittenden Duval:  The Last Survivor of the Goliad Massacre by William Corner; The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Vol 1, No. 17 (July 1897), pp 47 – 67.
~ Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas; tshaonline.org.


DUVAL, JOHN CRITTENDEN (1816 – 1897), PRISONER OF WAR, ESCAPED THE GOLIAD MASSACRE, TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR; TEXAS RANGER; CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY, AMERICAN CIVIL WAR.
HOMETOWN:  Bardstown, Kentucky, USA.
OTHER RESIDENCE:  Florida.  Texas.
DATE OF BIRTH:  14 March 1816 in Bardstown, Kentucky.
PARENTS:  Nancy Hynes and William Pope Duval.
SPOUSE:
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:  Bardstown, Kentucky.
ENLISTMENT DATE:                                                                                                                                            DISCHARGE DATE:
RANK:  
BRANCH OF SERVICE: Kentucky Volunteers.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION:  Captain Burr H. Duval’s Company, First Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, U. S. Army, nicknamed “Mustangs.”  The unit was organized in November, 1835 in Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.  Colonel James Walker Fannin was in charge at the Battle of Coleto.
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:  The Battle of Coleta, Texas Revolutionary War Of Independence.
1845:  A Texas Ranger.
1861 – 1865, Captain, Confederate States Army, American Civil War.
DATE OF DEATH:  15 January 1897.
STATUS:  Escaped the Goliad Massacre.  Became a Texas Ranger.  Served as Captain in the Confederate States Army, American Civil War.  An American author.
CEMETERY:
SOURCES:  ~ John Crittenden Duval:  The Last Survivor of the Goliad Massacre by William Corner; The Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association, Vol 1, No. 17 (July 1897), pp 47 – 67.  
~ Texas State Historical Association, Handbook of Texas; tshaonline.org.

 

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RUTHERFORD
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RUTHERFORD, JOSEPH (1798 – 1836), DIED AT THE FALL OF THE ALAMO, TEXAS REVOLUTIONARY WAR FOR INDEPENDENCE.
HOMETOWN:  Kentucky.
DATE OF BIRTH:  1798 in Kentucky.
PARENTS:  Rhoda Rutherford and Julias Rutherford, an American Revolutionary War Soldier, who was part of General George Washington’s winter encampment at Valley Forge.  Rhoda was the daughter of Elizabeth M. Adkins and Joseph W. Rutherford, Jr., who was the son of Mary E. Elliott and Joseph Rutherford, Sr., who was the son of Margaret Vawter and Robert Rutherford.
GRANDPARENTS:  Ursula Parrish and William O. Rutherford.
GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Violetta Reynolds and John Rutherford.
GREAT-GREAT-GRANDPARENTS:  Margaret Vawter and Robert Rutherford.
SPOUSE:  Elizabeth White.
DAUGHTER:  Carmelita Rutherford, who married first, Samuel Bean and married second, William Martin.  Carmelita and Samuel’s son was Joseph D. Bean.
GRANDSON:  Joseph J. D. Bean of Kentucky, enlisted 29 March 1862 at Alto, Texas; Private, Company E, 28th Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Randal’s) (First Texas Lancers) Confederate States Army, American Civil War.  [Did Joseph Bean die in The Battle of Mansfield or did he survive the war?]
ENTERED SERVICE FROM:
ENLISTMENT DATE:
DISCHARGE DATE:  6 March 1836 at The Alamo, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas in the Texas Revolutionary War of Independence. 
RANK:  Private.  Garrison Member.
BRANCH OF SERVICE:  Artillery.
COMBAT ORGANIZATION: 
~ Joseph Rutherford, Marksman, Alamo Garrison Member, Captain William R. Carey’s Artillery Company, The Texas Revolutionary War for Independence.
BATTLES, CAMPAIGNS, THEATRES:  The Siege and Fall of the Alamo, February 23 – March 6, 1836, in the Texas Revolution.
DATE OF DEATH:  6 March 1836 at The Alamo, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas in the Texas Revolutionary War of Independence.
STATUS:  Died at The Alamo in Texas Revolutionary War of Independence.
DISPOSITION:  The manner in which human remains were finally handled was complicated.
FUNERAL PYRES BURNED THE BODIES.
FIRST KNOWN BURIAL OF ASHES:  “Formerly Buried in the Sanctuary of the Old San Fernando Church.”
REPATRIATED:  Exhumed July 28, 1936.
EXPOSED TO PUBLIC VIEW FOR A YEAR IN 1937.
ENTOMBED, MAY 11, 1938.
CEMETERY:  The Alamo, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.
MEMORIAL:  “The Archdiocese of San Antonio erected this memorial, May 11, A. D., 1938.”
MEMORIAL CARVING:  “In Memory of the Heroes, who Sacrificed Their Lives at The Alamo, March 6, 1836, in Defense of Texas.  They Chose Never to Surrender Nor Retreat. ...”  Erected by the State of Texas, 1936 ... to Commemorate One Hundred Years of Texas Independence.”
MONUMENT:  “Cenotaph (empty tomb) erected in Alamo Plaza, where one of the three funeral pyres lifted the souls of the sacrificed.  The bodies of our heroes were destroyed and rendered unto ash.”
SOURCES:  ~Findagrave.
~ Historical Southern Families, Volume IV by John Bennett Boddie, 1960.
~ Joseph Rutheford, Biography by John “J-Cat” Griffith, Findagrave.
~ Sons of Dewitt Colony; sonsofdewittcolony.org.
~ Texas State Historical Association; tshaonline.org.
~ Texas, U. S., Muster Roll Index Cards.
~ The Battle of the Alamo by Stephen L. Hardin.
NOTE:  I placed my husband’s third-cousin-five-times-removed, Joseph Rutherford, on my ~ Sammons Bradshaw Ferguson Wooton Castle Hopkins Daniel Spencer; McCoy Stafford Stanley May Rutherford Brashear Williamson Ball ~ In-law Family Tree, that I created on Ancestry. 


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